This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.
 

Noticeboard

Great New Online Appointment Booking App - For IPhone (Android to follow)

Download the App now to your IPhone and make booking and cancelling appointments so much easier SystmOne Online App  (you will need to have registered for online appointments to use the App.  )

 

 

FLU CLINIC APPOINTMENTS NOW BEING MADE. CONTACT THE SURGERY NOW TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT

*******************************

PLEASE LET THE SURGERY KNOW YOUR CURRENT UP TO DATE  TELEPHONE NUMBER

  ********************

APPOINTMENTS

For non-urgent appointments, please telephone or call into the surgery. Please let us know as soon as possible if you cannot keep an appointment so that we may offer it to another patient who may need seeing.

 

 

EMERGENCY FACILITY

If you require to be seen urgently, please tell the receptionist the nature of your request to assess the urgency. This facility is for emergency cases only and we ask you to not use this service for routine problems.

HOME VISITS

These should be reserved for patients who are genuinely too ill to attend surgery. Please telephone before 10.00am and be prepared to answer a few questions to help the doctors plan their calls and to give the doctors an idea of urgency. Please remember the doctor can see at least four patients in surgery in the time taken to do one visit.  

Flu Clinic

 Children Age 2, 3 & 4 Nasal Flu Clinic

 

Thursday 27th November

2014

2.00pm - 4.00pm

All children age 2, 3 and 4 and whose date of birth is on or after 2nd September 2009 and on or before 1st September 2014 are eligable the nasal flu vaccine.  The Nasal Flu Clinic is being held on the above date.  Contact the surgery NOW to book your appointment.

Frequently asked Question

My child turns 2 in October, can they have the flu vaccine?

All children aged 2, 3 or 4 years on 1st September 2014 are eligable for a flu vaccination.  Those who have turned 2 after that date are not eligable, unless they are in an 'at risk' group.

 

Flu Clinic 

 

 

Thursday 6th November 

2014

2.00pm - 4.00pm

 

 

 Who should have the flu jab?

 
 
 
 

For most people, flu is an unpleasant illness, but it's not serious. If you are otherwise healthy, you will usually recover from flu within a week.

However, certain people are more likely to develop potentially serious complications of flu , such as bronchitis and pneumonia . These people should have a flu jab each year.

 

People who should have a flu jab

The injected flu vaccine is offered free of charge on the NHS to people who are at risk to ensure that they are protected against catching flu and developing serious complications.

You are eligible to receive a free flu jab if you: 

  • are 65 years of age or over  
  • are pregnant 
  • have certain medical conditions (see below) 
  • are living in a long-stay residential care home or other long-stay care facility 
  • receive a carer's allowance, or you are the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill 
  • are a healthcare worker with direct patient contact or a social care worker (see below)

Speak to your GP about whether you should have the flu vaccine if you are the parent of a child who is over six months old and has a long-term condition. Your child's condition may get worse if they catch flu.

 

Flu vaccine for people with medical conditions

The injected flu vaccine is offered free of charge on the NHS to anyone with a serious long term health condition. That includes these types of illnesses:  

 

If you live with someone who has a weakened immune system, you may also be advised to have a flu vaccine. Speak to your GP about this.

 

Pregnant women and the flu jab

If you're pregnant, you're advised to have the injectable flu vaccine, regardless of the stage of pregnancy you've reached.

That's because there's strong evidence to suggest that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu.

If you're pregnant, you will benefit from the flu vaccine because it:

  • reduces your chance of getting serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia, particularly in the later stages of pregnancy
  • reduces your risk of having a miscarriage or your baby being born prematurely or with a low birthweight, due to flu
  • will help protect your baby because they will continue to have some immunity to flu for the first few months of their life

It's safe to have the flu vaccine at any stage of pregnancy, from conception onwards. The vaccine doesn't carry any risks for you or your baby. Talk to your GP or midwife if you are unsure about the vaccination.

Read more about the flu jab in pregnancy .

 

Flu vaccine for health and social care workers

Outbreaks of flu can occur in health and social care settings, and, because flu is so contagious, staff, patients and residents are all at risk of infection.

If you're a frontline health and social care worker, you can protect yourself, your colleagues and other members of the community, by having the flu vaccine.

If you care for someone who is elderly or disabled, speak to your GP about having a flu jab along with the person you care for has the flu jab.



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website